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Premier League W2W4: Arsenal should look to Aaron Ramsey, Liverpool need a big win

Premier League W2W4: Arsenal should look to Aaron Ramsey, Liverpool need a big win

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Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp has vowed not to repeat his celebration in Sunday's Merseyside derby after being fined £8,000 by the Football Association.

Klopp reacted to Divock Origi's stoppage-time winner against Everton at Anfield by running to the centre circle and celebrating with Liverpool goalkeeper Alisson.

In a statement on Tuesday, the FA said the Reds manager "admitted an FA improper conduct charge and accepted the standard penalty."

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Deliberate isolation. Petty feuds. Constant turmoil. The Manchester United manager wouldn't have it any other way, writes Sam Borden.

Is there such a thing as peaking too early? Given all that Kylian Mbappe, just 19, has accomplished, we might soon find out.

"I didn't want to do it and I can say it won't happen again," Klopp told a news conference on Tuesday. "It was not on my radar that it was still possible.

"We make mistakes, but usually I learn from it -- at least over a long period. It's not a massive mistake. If there was no rule against it, we as managers would constantly celebrate on the pitch.

"I don't think anybody thought it's massively wrong, not even the ref -- they were probably surprised themselves. There's nothing to say, actually. It's a fine, I pay it. Let's carry on."

Klopp said he had apologised to his counterpart Marco Silva at the final whistle on Sunday, although that was disputed by the Everton manager in the immediate aftermath of the match.

Silva told a news conference on Tuesday he did not feel that Klopp's actions warranted punishment from the FA.

"If you ask me, I think he shouldn't [be fined]," he said. "But the FA has to decide the rules.

"Of course in that moment, the manager cannot think of fines or not. It's a moment to celebrate. I know the last two days everybody is talking about the situation.

"But, for me, it's not even a matter because it's normal in football. It's really important as well, even if sometimes you get fined. It's something important, this passion of the game."

Klopp will be in the dugout when Liverpool travel to Burnley in the Premier League on Wednesday. Sadio Mane and Andrew Robertson are doubts for the trip with injuries sustained in the derby.

"Sadio and Robbo, we need to have another look at today," Klopp said. "Sadio really had an awful cut on his foot. It needed to be stitched.

"He is OK, but walking around here now in flip-flops and you don't play in flip-flops. That means in this moment he is not ready, but we will see later.

"With Robbo, it is not as serious as with Sadio, but we need to have a look.

"We are all long enough together that we know about the specific challenge against Burnley. It's a really tough place to go."

Tottenham Hotspur manager Mauricio Pochettino has tipped Kelvin Davis, who played for him at Southampton, to have a bright future in management.

Spurs face struggling Southampton -- with former goalkeeper Davis in caretaker charge following the sacking of Mark Hughes -- at Wembley on Wednesday, and Pochettino said he was looking forward to seeing him.

"He was our player, my first captain," he told a news conference. "He was a great personality, a great character, a great man, and it's so nice to face him tomorrow.

"It's a difficult situation for us both, because we both need to win. But I know his dream is to be a coach, to be a manager. He has the capacity and quality to be a great manager in England or in another country.

"Of course I care a lot for Southampton. When Southampton changed the project after a year and a half I needed to go away, but my affection remains. I think it was one of the best periods in my life that we spent there.

"Of course I'm not happy with [their] situation. But it's sure they have the tools to lift from that situation."

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Tottenham go into the match on the back of a 4-2 defeat at Arsenal in the North London derby, but Pochettino said he had been happy with his side's display on Sunday.

"Until we conceded the third goal in the 77th minute it was an even game," he said. "The performance was good.

"Last season they were much, much better when we lost 2-0. Of course, the result is so disappointing but I'm proud of the players, the performance, the effort -- to cope with three big games in seven days is so difficult."

Both Spurs and Arsenal have been charged by the FA for failing to control their players after a first-half brawl, sparked when Eric Dier celebrated his goal by putting his finger to his lips in front of Arsenal's fans and substitutes.

"It's difficult to control emotions in that moment," Pochettino said. "To be honest, I didn't talk with him.

"If you're a Tottenham fan, you take it in one direction. If you're an Arsenal fan, you take in another direction. If you're the manager of Tottenham or Arsenal, or the Arsenal players doing the warm-up, you're going to back your players.

"Now it's just to accept the FA charge or not. It's under investigation. If we did something wrong, it's normal to pay."

Pochettino added that he felt Spurs, now fifth in the Premier League and behind Arsenal on goal difference, were continuing to improve.

"Last season, at the same stage of the season, we had six points less than today," he added. "I think after Liverpool and Everton we're the team that improves the most -- more than Arsenal, [Manchester] City, United or Chelsea."

LONDON -- Maurizio Sarri confirmed that he would like to see David Luiz and Cesc Fabregas follow Cesar Azpilicueta in signing new Chelsea contracts, but admitted that the club's policy of only offering one-year deals to players over the age of 30 is a sticking point in negotiations.

Chelsea announced on Tuesday that Azpilicueta had signed a contract extension committing him to Stamford Bridge until June 2022, while both Marcos Alonso and N'Golo Kante have put pen to paper on lucrative new deals in recent weeks.

Luiz and Fabregas are among several Chelsea first-team players set to be free agents next summer and both have expressed a desire to stay beyond this season. Sarri wants to keep the pair, and remains confident that his club will find a way to get it done -- though he suggested they may have to compromise.

"I spoke with the club one month ago about this," Sarri told a news conference. "I know very well that it's not easy, but I think that we can do a new deal for both.

"They are very important players for us. It's very difficult to find a centre-back for this level [like Luiz], and it's very difficult to find a central midfielder technically like Fabregas. And so I think they have to stay with us."

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Asked if Chelsea's one-year policy for veterans is complicating matters, Sarri replied: "The deal is very difficult for this reason, I think. Because the club wants a short contract, and the players want a long contract. So it's difficult for this reason. But I think, at the end, we can find a solution.

"I think that David and Cesc are leaders. And so I think it's very important for me, for the staff, and also for their teammates that they stay with us.

"I know the difficulties of the new deal, as I said before. The problem is only one year, two years or three/four years for the new contract. But I think the club will be able to find the right solution."

Another player whose future at Chelsea remains uncertain is Ruben Loftus-Cheek. The 22-year-old has performed impressively in recent weeks but is yet to start in the Premier League, and is determined to get more regular first-team opportunities this season at Stamford Bridge or elsewhere.

Sources have told ESPN FC that Chelsea will not consider selling Loftus-Cheek under any circumstances in January, and Sarri reiterated that he does not want the midfielder to leave on loan in the New Year either.

"He played some matches in the Europa League and the League Cup, and he played matches in the Premier League without starting, I think," Sarri added. "He is, at the moment, very important for us. He had some problems to understand very well what I wanted, but now he is improving and, in the last two matches, I was really very happy with him.

"I want him to stay with me, to stay with us. So I think that there is no chance [of him leaving in January]."

Chelsea travel to Molineux to face Wolves on Wednesday with no significant injuries, though Mateo Kovacic (ankle) and Marcos Alonso (back) are carrying knocks and will be assessed closer to kick-off.

It can be an impossible job following a club legend -- just ask David Moyes, Louis van Gaal and Jose Mourinho. They will all come up with their own reasons why it has been so difficult to replicate the successes of Sir Alex Ferguson at Manchester United, but you can imagine Unai Emery listening to their excuses with a broad grin on his face.

With Arsene Wenger vacating the manager's office at Arsenal after almost 22 years in charge last summer, the initial narrative was that his successor would face the same nightmare scenario at the Emirates that has greeted those who have since walked in Ferguson's footsteps at Old Trafford.

A club run by one man for more than two decades that had become outdated, perhaps even dysfunctional, behind the scenes.

An imbalanced squad -- Ferguson left an old one behind, Wenger bequeathed one that was overloaded with flair players but lacking in those who could win the ball -- and an ownership group which seemed to have taken its eye off the ball while emerging rivals began to overtake them.

In truth, there were clear differences between the squads left behind by Ferguson and Wenger.

Ferguson handed over the reins to the Premier League champions and a club accustomed to regularly winning silverware, while Emery walked into the Emirates with Arsenal having fallen some way from their glory days under Wenger during the late 1990s and early 2000s.

It remains a matter of debate as to which was the toughest job to inherit -- a successful, but ageing, team of champions at United or a listless Arsenal that had become more desperate for reinvigoration than instant glory -- but whichever side of the argument you land upon, nobody could legitimately suggest that Emery would have it easy at the Emirates.

Yet less than six months into the job, the Spaniard is proving that following a club legend really isn't an impossible task.

Arsenal, as a club, are showing United that there is a way to ensure a calm transition from one era to the next.

Sunday's comeback victory against Tottenham in the North London derby at the Emirates was, as a performance, the complete opposite to what Arsenal had become under Wenger, showing fight and an ability to react under pressure in the biggest of games.

Perhaps United's mistakes during the five years since Ferguson retired have been crucial in terms of guiding Arsenal away from similar calamities, but when Emery and his team walk out at Old Trafford for the Premier League clash with United on Wednesday, it will be the London club who look best equipped for the years ahead.

Emery and Arsenal have been smart where United, and the three managers post-Ferguson, have been indecisive and bungling.

Moyes was too slow and too weak-willed at United when it came to being ruthless with the players he inherited, but Emery has wasted no time in being assertive.

He quickly signed off Jack Wilshere's exit during the summer and has swiftly dealt with Mesut Ozil. Emery is prepared to accommodate the mercurial German, but only when it suits the team. The days of him being indulged are over.

Emery has also improved players on the training ground, something that Moyes, Van Gaal and Mourinho have struggled to do at United. Alexandre Lacazette and Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang are two obvious examples who have made strides forward this season.

The former Sevilla and Paris Saint-Germain coach, together with head of recruitment Sven Mislintat and head of football Raul Sanllehi, has quietly, but effectively, remoulded the squad, too.

Wenger left behind some supremely talented players, but the absence of tenacity and drive in midfield and defence was a fatal flaw -- one that has been corrected by the signings of the outstanding Lucas Torreira and the commanding Sokratis.

United have lurched from one bad signing to another post-Ferguson -- in terms of value, age profile and suitability for the Premier League -- largely because they have no clear recruitment strategy or structure at the club.

Even now, when all of their major rivals have moved onto a 21st century model, United's buying and selling still boils down to two men -- Mourinho and Ed Woodward -- thrashing it out, with sparks flying, when the transfer window is open.

Woodward, the executive vice-chairman, is only now coming around to the realisation that United need a director of football to enable the club to be more successful in the transfer market, but Arsenal prepared for Wenger's departure by ensuring that they had a system in place before the managerial change happened.

United's failure post-Ferguson has been a collective one, with Woodward and successive managers all sharing their blame for the club's current predicament, which sees them way off the pace in the Premier League and once again looking for wholesale changes in the squad.

But Arsenal's ability to ride out the post-Wenger storm has also been a collective effort, with the now-departed chief executive Ivan Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat deserving as much credit as Emery. The manager is the one in the firing line, though, so Emery will be most vulnerable to any failure to succeed.

Yet his new team travels to Old Trafford looking to extend their unbeaten run to 20 games, so he is clearly doing something right.

United could do worse than take note of how Arsenal have made the impossible job look so easy, on and off the pitch.

Ahead of a busy Wednesday of action in the Premier League, W2W4 looks at the main storylines to keep an eye on.

Can Arsenal make use of Ramsey while he's still around?

If Sunday's win over Tottenham convinced a few doubters that this Arsenal team now look like the real deal, a victory at Old Trafford would erase another psychological block left over from the dregs of the Arsene Wenger era. The Gunners haven't beaten United at their home in the league since 2006, unable to defeat their old enemy even in the very darkest days of their post-Ferguson funk.

Their best chance of doing that might be to make full use of a player who won't be around for too much longer. Unai Emery confirmed at the weekend that the decision not to offer Aaron Ramsey a new contract is final, and the Welshman will be leaving, either in January or next summer. This was shortly after Ramsey proved his worth, changing the game after coming off the bench against Spurs, setting up two goals and generally being the sort of dynamic presence that fits with this new Arsenal.

As United have shown a few times this season, they can crumble if a team goes at them, which combined with their defensive problems (Jose Mourinho picked Scott McTominay and Nemanja Matic at the back in the 2-2 draw with Southampton) points to an aggressive approach being the way to go.

Ramsey's rise to prominence coincides with the brilliant form of Arsenal's two strikers, with Alexandre Lacazette and Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang notching up three more goals at the weekend. So how about an ambitious forward line of those two, with Ramsey just behind them? It would be a bold move, but the way things are going under Emery, he seems brave enough to make it.

Should Spurs be worried about Lloris?

It's been nearly seven years now that Tottenham, for all the myriad problems they've encountered, knew they could at least rely on their goalkeeper. Hugo Lloris was the comfort blanket they needed, so reliable that they had one less thing to worry about, but France's World Cup-winning captain has now become something of a concern.

Just this season his mistakes have cost them in the Champions League and at home: games against Barcelona, Crystal Palace, PSV and Cardiff spring instantly to mind as ones where he has been erratic.

Against Arsenal too, Lloris's confused decision-making showed itself, this time in a more subtle way. His limp attempts at saving their second and third goals were not the only problems with Tottenham's performance against their rivals, but the thought that their defenders can no longer entirely rely on the man behind them is a significant concern for coach Mauricio Pochettino -- at a time when Spurs need all the help they can get to keep pace with those around them.

Liverpool could do with a convincing performance

Being more mature, winning while playing badly, enjoying a little luck: call Liverpool's start to the season what you will, but it's certainly impressive that they've managed to keep on Manchester City's coattails as Pep Guardiola's side strides imperiously through the Premier League season.

At some point, though, it would be nice to see them truly blow an opponent away, rather than grinding out the points. Jurgen Klopp wants to move away from being irresistible one minute then fragile the next, which is entirely understandable. But at this stage they have managed to eke out points while appearing slightly unconvincing.

What better team than Burnley to reverse that? Sean Dyche's men are only a point off the bottom having lost five of their past six, and are shipping goals at a prodigious rate. Mohamed Salah, Sadio Mane, Roberto Firmino and Co. will rarely have a juicier opportunity.

Will Loftus-Cheek get his chance?

Perhaps we focus too much on Ruben Loftus-Cheek because he's an increasingly rare Englishman in the Premier League, but it is difficult to see what else the midfielder can do to get a regular run-out for Chelsea.

His strike against Fulham was his fifth goal in his past six appearances, and while three of those were against BATE Borisov in the Europa League, he's been doing exactly what a fringe player should do: impressing on the rare occasions when he is picked.

Loftus-Cheek will reportedly make a decision about his immediate future soon, and may seek another loan away from Stamford Bridge in January, but that might depend on how many more chances Maurizio Sarri gives him. He deserves more, certainly.

Has the Wolves bubble burst?

It must have been easy for those around Wolves -- the players, the fans, the hot dog sellers -- to get a little carried away with the hype surrounding them in the opening weeks of the season. Talk that Nuno Espirito Santo's side were the best team to ever get promoted to the Premier League was giddy but not without basis, given how they played in those first couple of months.

Things have changed. They've lost five of the past six, all of a sudden their defence looks shaky, and therefore their toothless attack (just 13 goals in 14 games) is further exposed. Friday's defeat against Cardiff must have set the alarm bells ringing louder, and while they have enough of a gap between themselves and the bottom for now, they need some results soon.

For Chelsea's visit on Wednesday, Nuno must find some of the confidence that came with that early run. If they can get that and attack their visitors, they might still have a chance. But if they play as meekly has they have been, their slip down the table will continue.

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